• Psychology

  • Courses

     » Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

    PSY 1010 Introductory Psychology
    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to why and how we think, feel, and act as we do. We will survey the broad field of psychology, exploring such topics as the brain and relevant physiology, perception, sensation, memory, thought, language, emotion, personality, abnormality, treatment of psychopathology, and more. We will discuss leading theorists and their groundbreaking work. Methods of research and classic and recent findings will be reviewed. Finally, students will study how psychology is learned from, and applied to, real life situations.

    PSY 1110 Developmental I: Child
    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to perceptual, social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development in children and adolescents. Specific topics to be covered include sensory, intellectual, language, personality, and moral development. We will discuss leading theorists and examine their writings. We will also survey methods of developmental research and review classic and recent findings. Students will study how developmental psychology is learned from, and applied to, real life situations. Please note that this course will contain a Torah U’Madda component, with some topics presented also from this unique perspective.
    Requirements: Regular attendance; informed class participation; textbook and additional reading assignments; significant "online class participation" and assignment completion (including videos, quizzes, and raising your own "MyVirtualChild"); three in-class exams; child interview project and paper; one in-class oral presentation; departmental research requirement
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1113 Development of Language
    3 credits

    The nature of language and its development; phonology, syntax and morphology, reading; focuses on processes and course of normal development; pathological groups such as the deaf; language as a cognitive and communicative system.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1120 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
    3 credits

    This class will focus on different types of specialized needs, including Intellectual Disabilities, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Cerebral Palsy, and Seizure Disorders, among others. We will cover the history of the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities; attitudes towards and depictions of developmental disabilities throughout history; and the causes, prevention, and treatment of disorders. We will learn about the challenges and successes of people with various degrees and types of developmental disability in the real world, explore the philosophy of disability that leads some human characteristics to be viewed as “disabling” while others remain simply “differences”, and discuss the impact that different views of disability have on the acceptance and inclusion of people with specialized needs as well as the development of policies affecting this population.
    Requirements include a midterm exam, a final exam, a term paper/project, and class participation.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1124 Learning Disabilities
    3 credits

    An overview of the topic of learning disabilities, from the beginnings of the field to current knowledge and practice. History of the field, the changing definition of learning disabilities, their different types, genetic and environmental causes, and their assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Current trends in the field, social aspects of learning disabilities, and learning disabilities in adulthood. 

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1130 Developmental II
    3 credits

    In this course we will explore adult development from a variety of perspectives. Our discussions will emphasize physical, cognitive, and social development, and also problems that may arise during development. Students will sharpen their critical thinking skills through examination of research studies and methods. We will also discuss how developmental psychology is learned from, and applied to, real life situations.
    Requirements: Regular attendance; informed class participation; textbook and additional reading assignments; significant "online class participation" and assignment completion (including videos, quizzes); 3-4 in-class exams; interview project and paper; in-class oral presentation.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1110.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1150 Psychology of Language
    3 credits

    Language comprehension and production; speech perception. Critical examination of linguistic theory, theories of language learning, language as a perceptual and cognitive process, brain mechanisms, reading, and language disorders.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1110.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1301 Psychological Tests and Measurements
    3 credits

    Theory and method of measuring human behavior; construction and evaluation of tests of abilities, aptitudes, achievement, attitudes, and adjustment; ethical issues in testing.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1601 Theories and Systems
    3 credits

    Theory and theory construction in psychology; constructs and models; major theories and present state of theory and systematic orientations.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 1602 Historical Perspectives
    3 credits

    Theoretical and methodological problems of contemporary psychology; case histories tracing the development of research from origins to contemporary status in such fields as psychophysics, biological foundations, perception, learning, personality, and social psychology.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2100C Experimental Psychology
    4 credits

    This course focuses on helping students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to become intelligent critics of research in the behavioral and social sciences. In this course, students are required to read primary source journal articles in an area of interest and then, working in groups , to develop an original research question, or hypothesis, based on those readings. Once students have formulated their hypothesis they are required to design and run an experiment to test that hypothesis. In this class, students actually have the opportunity to test subjects, analyze data using SPSS statistical software, and then write up their results in a final APA format term paper.
    Requirements include class participation, two midterm exams, summaries of research articles, a poster presentation and a final term paper.(lecture: 2 hours; lab: 3 hours)
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010 and PSY 1021.

    PSY 2110 Sensory Psychology
    3 credits

    The senses and their fundamental role in the regulation of behavior; systematic treatment of vision, audition, and the other senses, with some application to human engineering.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010. Recommended: PSY 3804.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2111 Psychology of Perception
    3 credits

    The study of perception is the oldest part of modern psychology. Since much of what we know about the world comes from our senses, the study of these processes assumes vital importance. Through lectures, homework assignments, discussions, and demonstrations, students study all five senses, with emphasis on vision and hearing, and explore topics such as psychophysics, color vision, tone perception, and object recognition.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2140 Learning
    3 credits

    Introduction to general concepts and philosophical roots as well as classical and contemporary issues of learning theory. Examination of behavioral as well as cognitive models; life span developmental issues; the neural basis of learning and memory; and clinical applications of learning theory.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2150 Cognitive Psychology
    3 credits

    Examines the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena of cognitive psychology. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments contribute to students’ understanding. Topics to be considered include reasoning, language, problem solving, creativity, and decision making.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2154 Motivation
    3 credits

    Physiological, behavioral, psychodynamic, and humanistic approaches to motivated behavior. Focuses on hunger, thirst, reproduction, play, aggression, addiction, and achievement.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.
    Recommended: PSY 3800, PSY 3804.

    PSY 2155 Memory
    3 credits

    How memories are encoded, stored, and retrieved; long-and short-term memory; forgetting; neurobiological basis of memory; experimental and clinical syndromes of memory loss.
    Prerequisites: PSY 2150.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2400 Psychology of Adjustment
    3 credits

    A comprehensive, research-oriented treatment of the complex issues underlying psychological adjustment. Issues and problems encountered in daily life will be explored from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Topics include: academic performance; stress and coping; interpersonal relationships and communication; biopsychosocial perspectives on physical health; disordered behavior; behavior change.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2414 Abnormal Psychology
    3 credits

    Theories and research into causes of neuroses, psychoses, and deviant behavior; diagnosis and treatment.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 2430 Clinical Psychology
    3 credits

    History and background of clinical psychology; current research; functions and responsibilities of the clinical psychologist and related mental health personnel; introduction to diagnosis and psychotherapy; ethics of the profession.
    Prerequisite: PSY 2414.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3100 Comparative Psychology
    3 credits

    Evolution of behavior: a comparative study of growth and development of behavior in animals.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3105 Social Psychology
    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to social psychology, exploring how people think and behave in social situations. Specific topics to be covered include social thinking, social influence, and social relations. Students will develop critical thinking skills as we discuss research methods and review classic and recent findings. Additionally, we will examine how social psychology principles have been learned from, and applied to, real life situations. Please note that this is a Torah U’Madda oriented course, and topics will be presented also from this unique perspective.
    Requirements: Regular attendance, informed class participation, textbook and additional readings assignments, midterm, final exam, departmental research requirement
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3174 Psychology of Women
    3 credits

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3400 Educational Psychology
    3 credits

    Application of principles of learning, motivation, and measurement to education.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.
    Recommended: PSY 2150.

    PSY 3410 Applied Psychology
    3 credits

    Various areas in which principles of psychology have practical application: industry, business, education, advertising, communication; mass media and their effect on the individual.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3430 Positive Psychology  
    3 credits  
    The course involves the scientific study of human strengths and virtues. Since launched in 1998, it is among the fastest-growing specialties in psychology today. Positive psychology has gained prominence for theory related to individual, marital, familial, and community well-being--as well as for effective interventions. This course will examine human behavior that is effective, valuable, and contributes to personal growth and societal enrichment.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021

    PSY 3435 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
     3 credits
    Theory and practice of behavioral science in industry and business settings: selection techniques, merit rating, employee counseling; attitudes and morale; training, leadership, and job evaluation; time and motion studies; human ecology. 

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3440 Drugs and Behavior
    3 credits

    Basic issues relating to drug use and abuse, from biological, psychological, social, historical, and legal perspectives. Physiological and psychological factors in the initiation of drug use, including an overview of the biochemical and neurological mechanisms involved in drug action, the natural history of drug use, factors affecting the cessation of drug use, and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in drug abuse.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 

    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.

    PSY 3601 Health Psychology
    3 credits

    The contribution of psychological factors to the development, course, and treatment of physical illness and disease. Research methodology, basic theories, empirical studies, and clinical applications. Factors covered include weight control, alcoholism, smoking, heart and respiratory disease, cancer, and chronic illness.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3800 Personality
    3 credits

    Structure and dynamics of normal and abnormal personality development, including psychoanalytic and social learning approaches. Clinical diagnostic tests and procedures are discussed.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3804 Psychobiology
    3 credits

    Mind and body. The nervous system and endocrine glands in relation to psychological processes; physiological basis of perception, motivation, emotions, and learning.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3824 Neuropsychology
    3 credits

    The principles and concepts that shape current neuropsychological thinking; experimental and clinical techniques as well as models of brain organization. Neuropsychological signs, symptoms, and syndromes in conjunction with brain structure and function. Specific focus on the neuropsychological implications for attention, motor function, sensory-perceptual integration, memory and learning, language, and thinking, along with developmental, adult, and geriatric implications.
    Prerequisites: PSY 1010 or PSY 2150, PSY 3804.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3826 - Neural Basis of Consciousness

    3 credits

    This course concerns the neuroscientific literature on consciousness. It begins with a brief summary of the major philosophical and theoretical issues concerning consciousness and then covers (a) ordinary conscious states such as sleeping or dreaming, (b) pathological alterations such as hallucinations or delusions, (c) alterations seen under the influence of psychoactive drugs and (d) extra-ordinary experiences such as near-death or out-of body
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 3804, PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3840 Psychology and the Law

    3 credits 

    This course is designed to promote an understanding of the relationship between psychology and the law by showing how psychological research and theory can inform the legal process. As an introduction to this area, we will address a range of topics, which may include investigative psychology, expert testimony, violent offenders, competency to stand trial, the insanity defense, violence risk assessment, child custody, and correctional psychology.
    Prerequisites: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3850 Developmental Psychobiology
    3 credits

    Human development from a biological perspective. Behavioral genetics, ethology, the relationship between the developing nervous system and sensory, perceptual, and cognitive changes; biological origins of behavioral dysfunction.
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010 or PSY 3804.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 3860H Psychology and Religion
    3 credits

    Examines the reciprocal relationship between psychology and religion. On the one hand, the psychological underpinnings of the religious experience include social determinants, development of religious perspectives and cognitive/value structures, functional effects of religious experience and behavior, and dynamic/personality influences on religious practice. On the other hand, religious experience and practice impact psychological states with consequences for psychosocial aspects of cultural dynamics.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 4901 Independent Study

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021. 

    PSY 4911 Research in Psychology
    Variable credits

    Independent individual research projects done under the guidance of a psychology faculty member.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.

    PSY 4931; 4932 Problems in Psychology
    3 credits

    Seminars for majors involving extensive reading, discussion of several topics, and preparation of original papers.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.

    PSY 4933; Research seminars
    3 credits

    Seminars for majors involving extensive research activities focused on a specific topic.

    Prerequisite: PSY 1010.
    Co-requisite: PSY 1021.

    *STA 1021 is a valid substitute for PSY 1021 only for students who were full time an campus before April 2014

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