• The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program

  • SPRING 2016 Honors Program Courses

    Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester’s offerings. A brief description of the honors courses for the coming  semester is given below.

    Non-Honors students interested in taking an Honors course should follow the Procedure to Take Honors Courses

    ART

    American Architecture - 1630H
    Prof. Glassman
    Sec 361 Tue 6:45-9:30
    By comparing buildings from different eras and from different cultures, we will learn about the diverse traditions of American architecture, from its colonial beginnings to post-modern practices.  The result will be the basis for an architectural vocabulary and a greater consciousness of the built environment.
    We will examine not only what the first colonists found, what they created, and what they brought with them from Europe, but also aboriginal perspectives on landscape and shelter.  Thus, observations on numerous references to roots in European design will bring us to an initial definition of the nature of American architecture. We will develop an understanding of the vigor and innovations of its building arts by examining work not only of masters of the discipline, but also architecture without architects.  This introductory course will include lecture, discussion, critical written analysis, and oral presentations by each class member.  Frequent visits to architectural sites will highlight materials, form, ornamentation, and context.

    BIBLE

    Biblical Law and Society - 1187H
    Prof. Eichler
    Sec 311  Tue 1:05-2:45
    Prerequisite: BIB 1015 or 1000
    This course is designed to introduce students to the study of Biblical law and to explore the ways in which law serves as a reflection of a society’s worldview and its most basic cultural values. The goals of the course are to provide students with:
    1. skills to read a biblical legal text with greater clarity
    2.insight into the relationship between law and societal values
    3. appreciation of ancient Near Eastern law for understanding Biblical law
    4. awareness of the problematics of the study of Biblical law

    Literary Approaches to the Bible - 1500H
    Prof. Bernstein
    Sec 331  Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: BIB 1015 or 1000
    ;For more than three decades now, there has been a growing interest, reflected in an ever-growing number of publications by academic biblical scholars, in the literary aspects of the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh). Such concerns, of course, are not really new, since “literary” observations on the Bible, both prose and poetry, have been made (not always systematically) since the Middle Ages by exegetes and literary figures both Jewish and Christian, and may already be found, although even less systematically, in rabbinic literature.
    The goal of this course is to heighten and develop the student’s sensitivity to the literary techniques of the biblical authors, the aesthetics of the biblical text, and the (primarily non-ideological) reading strategies which have employed in their elucidation. It will focus broadly on the two most prominent forms in biblical literature, prose narrative and poetry. Students will read a balanced combination of primary biblical texts and useful secondary literature during the term, and eventually produce “literary critical” work of their own, which, if time allows, they will present to the class.
    Several written assignments (of different sorts) will contribute to the development of students’ analytical and communication skills.

    BIOLOGY

    Chemistry of Metals in Biology - 1379H
    Prof. Jiang
    Sec 241  Mon 4:30-5:45/Wed 6:45-9:45
    Prerequisite: CHE 1046
    Crosslisted with CHE 1379H

    Immunology: AIDS & Society - 3230H
    Prof. Feit
    Sec 331  Tue 3:00-4:40/Thu 6:45-10:05
    Prerequisites: CHE 1214R and any two of BIO 3207, BIO 4023, or BIO 3135
    Since the first description of the disease in 1981, AIDS has had a greater impact on societies throughout the world than any other modern epidemic. AIDS is a disease that attacks the immune system by disabling the system that is designed to ward off infection. The disease-causing agent, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), is spread primarily by sexual contact. It is a retrovirus and its pathology and epidemiology present unique challenges for prevention and cure. The impact of AIDS on the both western and Africian societies has been reflected in the arts and culture of these societies.

    In this course we will examine in depth, the immune system in health and disease, the biochemistry and molecular biology of retroviruses, and how various societies have responded both positively and negatively to this disease through the arts and public health initiatives.

    CHEMISTRY

    Advanced Laboratory Techniques - 1222H
    Prof. Camara
    Sec 331  Tue 3:00-4:15/Tue 6:45-10:45
    Prerequisite: CHE 1122
    Corequisite: CHE 1214R
    This course will introduce students to advanced techniques in chemical synthesis and analysis.  Understanding and familiarity with these advanced techniques is vital to understanding and participating in modern chemical research.  The course will provide training in air-sensitive chemistry, advanced experimental design, organometallic synthesis, polymer chemistry, materials chemistry, mechanistic analysis, and asymmetric synthesis.  Exploration of these topics will also involve exposure and training in advanced characterization techniques such as: heteronuclear NMR, 2D NMR, gas chromatography, molecular modeling, and natural product isolation. Students will gain experience in scientific writing and use of primary literature through five laboratory reports. 

    Chemistry of Metals in Biology - 1379H
    Prof. Jiang
    Sec 241
    Mon 4:30-5:45/Wed 6:45-9:45
    Prerequisite: CHE 1046
    Crosslisted with BIO 1379H

    COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Industrial Software Development - 4570H 
    Prof. Kelly
    Sec 231
    Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisites: COM 1320 and COM 3610 or 3780
    Corequisite: COM 4570L

    The content of this course will be to plan, develop, and deploy Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications on the web. The applications will be more complex than a simple website, yet achievable within one semester by small teams of 2-4 students.  Applications will be chosen for their potential benefit to the YU community. Industrial best practices for small teams shall be taught and employed throughout the project, including
    * source control,
    * comprehensive testing,
    * continuous integration,
    * issue tracking, and
    * agile project management.
    Course content will be based on the listed textbook with additional references to the official IEEE Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK) for professional certification of Software Engineers. Certification, however, is not a goal of this course.
    Student mastery of this content will be evaluated primarily based on the semester project described above. Programming teams will need to operate using industrial processes and make weekly progress reports. In addition, there will be a final examination and at least two smaller quizzes in the course of the semester.

    Industrial Software Development - 4570H
    Prof. Kelly
    Sec 231
    Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisites: COM 1320 and COM 3610 or 3780
    Corequisite: COM 4570L
    The content of this course will be to plan, develop, and deploy Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications on the web. The applications will be more complex than a simple website, yet achievable within one semester by small teams of 2-4 students. Applications will be chosen for their potential benefit to the YU community. Industrial best practices for small teams shall be taught and employed throughout the project, including
    * source control,
    * comprehensive testing,
    * continuous integration,
    * issue tracking, and
    * agile project management.
    Course content will be based on the listed textbook with additional references to the official IEEE Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK) for professional certification of Software Engineers. Certification, however, is not a goal of this course.
    Student mastery of this content will be evaluated primarily based on the semester project described above. Programming teams will need to operate using industrial processes and make weekly progress reports. In addition, there will be a final examination and at least two smaller quizzes in the course of the semester.

    Industrial Software Development Lab - 4570L
    STAFF
    Sec 481 Wed 8:15-9:45
    Corequisite: COM 4570H
     

    CONTEMPORARY WORLD CULTURES

    Music and the World Wars - 1013H
    Prof. Beliavsky
    Sec 261 Mon/Wed 6:45-8:00
    Crosslisted with MUS 1013H

    CULTURES OVER TIME
    History of Law - 1018H
    Prof. Burgess
    Sec 361 Tue/Thu 6:45-8:00
    Crosslisted with HIS 2601H

    ECONOMICS

    Financial Economics - 2601H
    Prof. Citanna
    Sec 341 Tue/Thu 4:30-5:45
    Prerequisites: ECO 1101 and MAT 1412 or instructor's permission
    Building on Intermediate Microeconomics, or equivalent, this course will provide a rigorous introduction to the economics of competitive financial markets. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, efficiency and market structure, no arbitrage and asset pricing, the CAPM, options, forward and futures contracts, (ir)rational exhuberance, information and asset markets, and herding, bank runs. No formal pre-requisites, but some familiarity with calculus and calculus of probability is required.

    ENGLISH

    Books on Books/Films on Films - 1001H
    Prof. Geyh
    Sec 341 Tue/Thu 4:30-5:45
    Prerequisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR 1010 or 1020
    Open to English majors and minors only
    Crosslisted with INTC 1001
    What are do literature and film tell us about themselves and each other? How is reading a novel or short story different from “reading” a film? What happens when a story passes from one medium to another? By addressing these questions, this course will help student to develop a deeper understanding of the relationships between literature and film, and through these relationships, of each medium.
    The course will begin by examining the key elements of literary and cinematic story telling, and of how these elements come together to produce the meaning of a story. Then we will explore various approaches used in the analysis of literature and film, by studying both theoretical texts about literature and film, and close readings of particular works in both media, with the aim of enabling students to create their own compelling interpretations of literature and film.
    Course texts will include Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451; Calvino, If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler; and Zusak, The Book Thief. Films will include The Wizard of Oz, Sherlock Jr., Stranger than Fiction, Singin’ in the Rain, and Fahrenheit 451. Critical texts will include Plato, Book X of The Republic; Wilde, “The Decay of Lying”; Rushdie, The Wizard of Oz; and Spadoni, A Pocket Guide to Analyzing Film.
    Requirements: Three papers and an exam.

    Writing Short Fiction - 1726H
    Prof. Chiu
    Sec 621 Fri 10:00-12:30
    Prerequisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR 1010 or 1020

    Modernisms: Music, Literature & Art - 2071H
    Prof. Stewart
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR 1010 or 1020

    FIRST YEAR WRITING

    First Year Writing, a mandatory course for all students in Yeshiva College
    and the Sy Syms School of Business, introduces students to college-level writing and prepares them for future academic writing. Every section of this course emphasizes writing process and revision, critical thinking, and other fundamental writing skills, including summary, paraphrase, analysis, synthesis, integration of multiple
    perspectives, and source documentation.
    Honors sections of First Year Writing are unique in that the program's smaller sections, available only to Honors Program students, begin at a higher discourse level and include more demanding and complex readings. Instructors of Honors sections work with students to develop thinking and writing skills through a variety of assignments and activities in a participatory, collaborative atmosphere.

    First Year Writing - 1020H
    STAFF
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Sec 241 Mon/Wed 4:30-5:45
    Sec 261 Mon/Wed 6:45-8:00
    Sec 341 Tue/Thu 4:30-5:45

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    Psychology of Public Opinion - 1007H
    Prof. Malka
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with PSY 3110H
    This multidisciplinary seminar will overview social scientific research on the psychological and social processes that underlie political opinion.
    Students will learn about empirical research in psychology and political science dealing with the origins and consequences of mass political attitudes. Some of the major topics we will cover are psychological and survey research methodology, genetic and environmental influences on political attitudes, political thinking, public opinion and election polling, and aggregate political opinion.
    The course will focus heavily on empirical studies and their conclusions. It will also include a current events component in which students discuss articles and blog posts that analyze recent public opinion evidence.Students enrolled in the honors section of this course will complete additional readings and writing assignments.

    HISTORY

    History of Law - 2601H
    Prof. Burgess
    Sec 361 Tue/Thu 6:45-8:00
    Crosslisted with CUOT 1018H

    Ideas of History - 3001H
    Prof. Stenhouse
    Sec 241 Mon/Wed 4:30-5:45

    HONORS

    Honors Thesis Seminar sessions focus on various aspects of the writing process and are shaped by the students' concerns and interests. Among other things, we may study process writing, disciplinary writing style differences, revision techniques, time management, and methods of organization. These seminars also help to create a scholarly community among our senior thesis writers.
    Honors Thesis Proposal - 4977H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H

    Honors Thesis Seminar I - 4978H

    Prof. Schwabe
    Corequisite: HON 4977H or HON 4980H

    4979H Honors Thesis Seminar II - 4979H
    Prof. Schwabe
    Corequisite: HON 4980H or 4981H

    Honors Thesis: Preparation - 4980H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

    Honors Thesis: Writing - 4981H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

    INTERPRETING THE CREATIVE

    Books on Books/Films on Films - 1001H
    Prof. Geyh
    Sec 341 Tue/Thu 4:30-5:45
    Crosslisted with ENG 1001
    What are do literature and film tell us about themselves and each other? How is reading a novel or short story different from "reading" a film? What happens when a story passes from one medium to another? By addressing these questions, this course will help student to develop a deeper understanding of the relationships between literature and film, and through these relationships, of each medium. The course will begin by examining the key elements of literary and cinematic story telling, and of how these elements come together to produce the meaning of a story. Then we will explore various approaches used in the analysis of literature and film, by studying both theoretical texts about literature and film, and close readings of particular works in both media, with the aim of enabling students to create their own compelling interpretations of literature and film.

    Course texts will include Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451; Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; O'Brien, "How to Tell a True War Story"; and Zusak, The Book Thief. Films will include The Wizard of Oz, Sherlock Jr., The Artist, Stranger than Fiction, Singin' in the Rain, and Fahrenheit 451. Critical texts will include Plato, Book X of The Republic; Wilde, The Decay of Lying; Arnheim, The New Laocoon; Rushdie, The Wizard of Oz; and Kawin, How Movies Work.

    JEWISH HISTORY

    Classical Jewish History - 1200H
    Prof. Mermelstein
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15

    The Jerusalem Temple - 3210H
    Prof. Fine
    Sec 241 Mon/Wed 4:30-5:45

    JEWISH PHILOSOPHY

    Philosophy of Rav Kook - 1816H
    Prof. Carmy
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Our task is the study of R. Kook's texts and their intellectual and literary background. We will try to divide the time between R. Kook's views of history and nationality, ethics and religion (using his letters and sections of Orot haKodesh); theory of knowledge (using various essays and Orot haKodesh). There will be an emphasis on mastering R. Kook's writing and learning to read him microscopically. We will also look at some of the (ab)uses to which R. Kook's writing has been subjected.
    Writing:a) short paper-- close reading of text in Ein Ayah; b) short paper examining an article or chapter in a book or thesis on R. Kook; c) short comparison of passages in light of editorial intervention; d) term paper (8-10 pages) on any aspect of R. Kook or religious Zionism or other pertinent subject.

    MATHEMATICS

    Please note that all Honors math courses will be offered through the graduate school
    Elliptic PDE - 5215
    Prof. Chen
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: MAT 1510, Recommended: MAT 2601
    In this course, we will introduce various methods in studying nonlinear elliptic partial differential equations, from classical ones to some modern techniques. After preparations for basic knowledge, such as Sobolev spaces, we will introduce typical methods in studying the existence, regularity, and other qualitative properties of solutions, including variational approaches, super- and sub- solutions, regularity liftings, maximum principles, and the method of moving planes. Then we will take the students to the current research front, so that they can continue to do some hands on research and write papers.
    The following book is the major source of the course:
    Methods on Nonlinear Elliptic Equations by Wenxiong Chen and Congming Li, ISBN: 1-60133-006-5.

    Mathematical Statistics - 5266

    Prof. Otway
    Sec 361 Tue/Thu 6:00-7:15
    Prerequisite: MAT 2461
    This is a graduate course which is open to qualified undergraduates. The prerequisite is MAT 2461 Probability Theory. The goal of the course is to understand statistical methods as assertions about the probability distributions of appropriately defined random variables. The failure to understand statistical methods in this way is the leading cause (ultimately, the only cause) of errors in statistical reasoning. A secondary goal is to obtain proficiency in the use of linear and nonlinear statistical models, and to be able to use those models for analysis and forecasting with the aid of the R programming language.

    MUSIC

    Music and the World Wars - 1013H
    Prof. Beliavsky
    Sec 261 Mon/Wed 6:45-8:00
    Open to Music majors and minors only.
    Crosslisted with COWC 1013H

    Music Cognition and Analysis - 1810H
    Prof. Ballan
    Sec 361 Tue/Thu 6:45-8:00
    Crosslisted with PSY 2110H
    This course explores psychological theories of expectation, and music-related expectations in particular. Questions include: How do listeners form music-related expectations? What explains the phenomenon of surprise in music? How can expectation be measured? What are the roles of auditory learning, statistical properties of music and mental representations of expectation?
    The required textbook is David Huron, Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation (MIT 2006). This will be supplemented with articles from the relevant scientific literature. We will also discuss pieces of music (particularly pieces in binary or verse-chorus forms, such as songs) that illustrate the psychological principles. The grade will be based one third on class participation, one third on a midterm and one-third on a final exam. There are no prerequisites.
    At the conclusion of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the psychology of expectation, as it applies in multiple domains, the way in which expectation and emotion are related, and the specific mechanisms and theories that are prevalent in the study of musical expectation.

    PHILOSOPHY

    Great Political Thinkers - 3401H
    Prof. Bevan
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with POL 1401H
    This Honors course introduces the Western political tradition in its complexity through classic text in political theory. In the classical tradition we shall read Plato and Aristotle. Representing modern political theory will be Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. In the contemporary theory bracket we shall include Foucalt for continental thought and John Rawls for Anglo-American thought. We shall be reading the primary texts as well as foremost critiques of each theorist.

    Political theorists raise questions about the operational dynamics and objectives of political life; they establish hypotheses or testable propositions concerning political institutions and relationships. Their major focus is political (public) power. They offer normative or ethical (deductive) perspectives on political life as well as empirical or scientific (inductive) analyses of political reality. The dual purpose of this course, therefore, is to learn to think conceptually about political life by becoming acquainted with significant propositions about political life advanced by major political thinkers of our Western tradition.

    Modern Political Foundation - 4930H
    Prof. Rogachevsky
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with POL 4930H
    This interdisciplinary course will examine and compare the seminal political ideas of two major events of modern times, the American and French Revolutions. The course will focus on the animating ideas behind these revolutions and the constitutional principles and practices put in place to advance them. Focusing on key primary documents of the French and American revolutions as well as important contemporaneous interpretations, the course aims to broaden students’ understanding of key questions at the heart of modern political philosophy and politics.
    Texts: Joseph M. Bessette and John Pitney, American Government and Politics
    Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
    François Furet, Revolutionary France
    Thomas Paine, Rights of Man
    Michael Walzer Ed., Regicide and Revolution
    Coursepack
    Requirements:
    1) Two Short Papers (6-8 pages) 20%
    2) Long Paper (15 pages) 30%
    3) Final Exam 40%
    4) Class Participation 10%

    Seminar: David Lewis - 4931H
    Prof. Segal
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    David Lewis was one of the greatest and most influential analytic philosophers of the past half-century. We will closely examine his fruitful, lucid, and imaginative work in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, and epistemology. You will discover why a hard-nosed scientifically-minded philosopher believes that there are ghosts and talking donkeys, that a sort of metaphysical magnetism connects our words to the world, and that we don’t know what mass or charge are. Previous acquaintance with philosophy is strongly advised.

    PHYSICS

    General Physics II: Recitation - 1052H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Sec 251 Mon 5:50-6:40
    Corequisite: PHY 1052R

    General Physics II - 1052R
    Prof. Cwilich
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    A calculus-based introduction to electromagnetism. Topics include electric charges and fields, direct-current and alternating-current circuits, magnetic dipoles and fields, electromagnetic induction and light as an electromagnetic wave.

    Advanced Physics Laboratory - 1810H
    Prof. Zypman
    Sec 631 Fri 11:00-1:30
    This is a project-based experimental course with emphasis on basic and applied physics and the connection between theory and measurements. Students are given a list of possible projects to work on. After familiarizing with the equipment and goals (via handouts and direct contact with the instruments, students are expected to design and implement the corresponding experiment. In the process students are expected to become familiar (and by the end of the semester master) data logging, focused observation and continuing questioning, and possible sources of uncertainties. These pieces of information must be put together in a report that emphasizes scientific transparency, simplicity (avoidance of unnecessary convoluted sentences), estimation of goodness of results, and graphical rendering of data. Reports( one per experiment) will be written following standards of the American Physical Society, and will be reviewed by the instructor and returned to the students with criticisms for improvement. On the second submission, students will receive a grade on their report. Recent projects include: Atomic Spectroscopy, Electromagnetic waveguides, Nuclear decay statistics, Charge of the electron, Electric filters, Blackbody radiation, Crystal diffraction, Thermocouple design, Nonlinear pendulum, Electric oscillators.

    POLITICAL SCIENCE

    Great Political Thinkers - 3401H
    Prof. Bevan
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with PHI 1401H
    This Honors course introduces the Western political tradition in its complexity through classic text in political theory. In the classical tradition we shall read Plato and Aristotle. Representing modern political theory will be Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche. In the contemporary theory bracket we shall include Foucalt for continental thought and John Rawls for Anglo-American thought. We shall be reading the primary texts as well as foremost critiques of each theorist.

    Political theorists raise questions about the operational dynamics and objectives of political life; they establish hypotheses or testable propositions concerning political institutions and relationships. Their major focus is political (public) power. They offer normative or ethical (deductive) perspectives on political life as well as empirical or scientific (inductive) analyses of political reality. The dual purpose of this course, therefore, is to learn to think conceptually about political life by becoming acquainted with significant propositions about political life advanced by major political thinkers of our Western tradition.

    Modern Political Foundation - 4930H
    Prof. Rogachevsky
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with PHI 4930H
    This interdisciplinary course will examine and compare the seminal political ideas of two major events of modern times, the American and French Revolutions. The course will focus on the animating ideas behind these revolutions and the constitutional principles and practices put in place to advance them. Focusing on key primary documents of the French and American revolutions as well as important contemporaneous interpretations, the course aims to broaden students’ understanding of key questions at the heart of modern political philosophy and politics.
    Texts: Joseph M. Bessette and John Pitney, American Government and Politics
    Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
    François Furet, Revolutionary France
    Thomas Paine, Rights of Man
    Michael Walzer Ed., Regicide and Revolution
    Coursepack
    Requirements:
    1) Two Short Papers (6-8 pages) 20%
    2) Long Paper (15 pages) 30%
    3) Final Exam 40%
    4) Class Participation 10%

    PSYCHOLOGY


    Music Cognition and Analysis - 2110H

    Prof. Ballan
    Sec 361 Tue/Thu 6:45-8:00
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSY 1021 or STA 1021
    Crosslisted with MUS 1810H
    This interdisciplinary course will examine and compare the seminal political ideas of two major events of modern times, the American and French Revolutions. The course will focus on the animating ideas behind these revolutions and the constitutional principles and practices put in place to advance them. Focusing on key primary documents of the French and American revolutions as well as important contemporaneous interpretations, the course aims to broaden students’ understanding of key questions at the heart of modern political philosophy and politics.
    Texts: Joseph M. Bessette and John Pitney, American Government and Politics
    Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
    François Furet, Revolutionary France
    Thomas Paine, Rights of Man
    Michael Walzer Ed., Regicide and Revolution
    Coursepack
    Requirements:
    1) Two Short Papers (6-8 pages) 20%
    2) Long Paper (15 pages) 30%
    3) Final Exam 40%
    4) Class Participation 10%

    Psychology of Public Opinion - 3110H
    Prof. Malka
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSY 1021 or STA 1021
    Crosslisted with HBSI 1007H
    This multidisciplinary seminar will overview social scientific research on the psychological and social processes that underlie political opinion.
    Students will learn about empirical research in psychology and political science dealing with the origins and consequences of mass political attitudes. Some of the major topics we will cover are psychological and survey research methodology, genetic and environmental influences on political attitudes, political thinking, public opinion and election polling, and aggregate political opinion.
    The course will focus heavily on empirical studies and their conclusions. It will also include a current events component in which students discuss articles and blog posts that analyze recent public opinion evidence.Students enrolled in the honors section of this course will complete additional readings and writing assignments.

    Psychology of Religion - 3860H
    Prof. Adler
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: PSY 1010
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSY 1021 or STA 1021
    In this course, we will analyze and discuss the reciprocal relationships between psychology and religion. Psychology takes as its subject various 'objects' - behavior, cognition, feeling/emotions, perception, social interaction. We examine all of these factors with respect to one category of behavior/psychology: religion, i.e. religious behavior, feelings, groups, myths/narratives.

    The Units of Religious Behavior:
    Behavior -- Ritual, prayer, kindness (chesed), aggression (wars)
    Cognition -- Faith, Doubt, Rationalism, Belief, Mysticism
    Emotions/Feelings Prayer/devotion (Gimme, thanks, oops, wow)
    Perceptions/Sensations Religious perspectives, personality differences
    Social Behavior, Aggregations, Cults, Terrorism

    For these psychological units, we will examine their function (or dysfunction), their origin in the individual, the group, and their evolutionary history.
    The course is inter-disciplinary: we employ the tools and insights of various bio- social disciplines: psychology, biology, clinical medicine/psychiatry, anthropology/sociology, and philosophy.

    SOCIOLOGY

    Medical Sociology - 2401H
    Prof. Kimmel
    Sec 331 Tue/Thu 3:00-4:15

    SPANISH

    Intermediate Spanish II - 1202H
    Prof. de Broitman
    Sec 231 Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15
    Prerequisite: SPA 1201
    This is the second semester of a two-semester Intermediate course. Intermediate Spanish II is designed to further develop the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish, and to deepen the students' exposure to the variety of cultural aspects within the Hispanic world, with a particular focus on literature. The primary objective of both sequences is to help the students reach a level in their command of the language that would allow them to communicate proficiently both in speaking and writing. The methodology used in the course
    will be primarily communicative, that is, actually using what the students already know and presenting the new material in authentic contexts. The complete course is intended to present students with a variety of Spanish and Latin American literary forms and authors. However, Intermediate II particularly focused on this aspect and students will have to read and analyze original texts by well-known Hispanic authors to a greater degree than what was required from them in Intermediate I. There is also an emphasis in writing and students will have several written assignments in the course of the semester. During the course of the semester there will be also be cultural activities both inside and outside of YC. These activities will be related to various aspects of the Hispanic cultural life in New York City and will include visits to museums and attendance to performances of plays by Hispanic authors. Participation in these activities will be mandatory and students will be expected to prepare a brief summary of each activity with their personal impressions. To the maximum extent possible, both sequences of the course will be taught in Spanish. For students in the old curriculum, this course fulfills the Gen Ed Literature requirement. For students in the new curriculum, Intermediate II can be counted as an INTC.

Yeshiva University
500 West 185th Street
New York, NY 10033
212.960.5400

Connect With YU