• The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program

  • FALL 2016 Honors Program Courses

    Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester’s offerings. A brief description of the honors courses for the coming  semester is given below.

    Non-Honors students interested in taking an Honors course should follow the Procedure to Take Honors Courses

    ART

    Rembrandt and the Jews - 1023H


     Prof. Soloveichik & Prof. Wisse


     Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

     Cross-listed with INTC 1023H

     
    Acclaimed for his Protestant-influenced interpretation of Scripture, Rembrandt van Rijn’s art – paintings, prints and drawings – demonstrate a rich sensitivity to specifically Jewish ideas and concerns. The artist's association with Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel and other members of Amsterdam’s Jewish community influenced his approach to Hebrew Biblical subjects, as well as his understanding of Christian theology. This inter-disciplinary course explores the character of Rembrandt’s depictions of Hebrew Biblical and Christian subjects by examining their relationship to Jewish exegesis, including Talmudic, Midrashic and Kabbalistic literature, to contemporary Jewish life in Amsterdam and to the art historical tradition. We will examine Rembrandt’s connections to the Jewish community of Amsterdam, his knowledge of and perspective on Jewish sources and customs, and the master’s place within the larger context of art history and theological discourse.


    Evolution of the Skyscraper - 1635H

     
Prof. Glassman


     Sec 361 Tu 6:45-9:30

     
    We shall examine the conception, development and construction of the skyscraper.  Since the tall office building flourished in Chicago as nowhere else during the last century, we shall begin with the roots of the tall office building in that city.  The course will include selections from the theoretical literature on the nature of the tall building, and we shall explore the evolution of this building type. Numerous site visits will employ New York City, with its unparalleled concentration of skyscrapers in lower and mid-town Manhattan, as our learning laboratory.  Presentations by practitioners and class members will be included as well.
    Topics:
    ▪      The early history of the tall office building:  embracing the machine age
    ▪      The impact of zoning ordinances on urban form
    ▪      The role of the real estate developer
    ▪      The architect and the design process
    ▪      Systems synthesis:  engineering and construction
    ▪      Making space comfortable:  the role of the interior architect

     

    BIBLE

    Genesis - 2000H


    Prof. Eichler

     
Sec 311 Tu 1:05-2:45


    Course summary in process

     

    Exodus - 2020H


     Prof. Carmy

     
Sec 341 Tu & Th 4:30-5:45

     

     This Honors course covers the story of the Exodus (chapters 1-15) through history of interpretation from inner-Biblical exegesis (Joshua, Samuel, Psalms, Nehemiah etc.) through Second Temple and Rabbinic literature and medieval and modern periods with emphasis on relevance to contemporary literary and theological study and appropriation. 

     

    Several short writing assignments + culminating paper and exam.

    BIOLOGY

    Topic: Stem Cells - 4934H


    Prof. Peter


     Sec 461 Th 6:45-8:25

     

     Topics in Stem Cells takes a careful look at contemporary breakthroughs in stem cell research as reported in the scientific literature. Through these findings, students will be introduced to cutting-edge molecular and cellular research methods and versed in the interpretation of scientific data. Areas to be covered in this course include: embryonic stem cells and cloning, somatic and hematopoietic stem cells, and induced pluripotental stem cells and cellular reprogramming. The final portion of this course deals with ethics and legislation.

     

    CHEMISTRY

    Chemical Analysis - 1122H

     
Prof. Juang


     Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45 | W 6:45-9:45

     
    This one-semester course introduces science majors and pre-health students to the principles and practice of analytical chemistry. The course begins with an introduction to analytical chemistry, including the analytical process, sampling, sources of error, statistics, and data interpretation. The course also covers major types of analyses, including wet methods, spectroscopy, chromatography, and potentiometric techniques. Classroom topics, discussions and problem solving exercises are closely coordinated with laboratory analyses. Honor session has higher requirements in laboratory practices.
     

    CULTURES OVER TIME

    The Monstrous - 1003H


     Prof. Lavinsky

     
Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45

    Course description in process

    ECONOMICS

    Money and Banking - 1221H


     Prof. Grivoyannis


     Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15
    Course description in process

    ENGLISH

    Graphic Novels and Animations - 2936H


     Prof. Stewart


     Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

     
    Introduction to the reading experience and analysis of the constantly evolving genres of the graphic novel and animation in the East and West, primarily the US and Japan. The course will approach these genres from the point of view of theme, idea, form, aesthetics, and craft. Together the class will ask and think about how we approach and read comics and animations—as well as how they approach and make contact with us—, about the nature of their expressive potential, and it will consider some of the ramifications of the democratizing of art production that these new genres and their technologies bring with them.
        Regarding the thematics of comics, graphic novels, and animations, the course will consider them in the context of their sub-genres: comedy, tragicomedy, family memoir, historical fiction and memoir. Among other concerns, it will deal with the question of why artists in the 20th and 21st centuries have so often been moved to turn to these genres when narrating stories relating to the Holocaust, to nuclear destruction, and to human rights crises, and, on a smaller, more individual level, often also when confronting the politics of race, gender, and sexuality. We will also try to understand the cultural politics of the super-hero phenomenon as well as the insistent tension between the utopian and the dystopian impulses in graphic novels and animations. 

    TEXTS/ANIMATIONS INCLUDE:
    Art Spiegelman, The Complete Maus: A Survivor’s Tale; Keiji Nakazawa, Barefoot Gen; Ari Folman, Waltz With Bashir ; Jason Shiga, Empire State: A Love Story (or Not); Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis; Jim Woodring, Congress of the Animals; South Park; Alison Bechdel, Fun House; Mat Johnson, Icognegro; Riyoko Ikeda, Claudine…! & The Rose of Versailles; Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons: Watchmen, Katsuhiro Otomo, Akira

    REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 short presentations; term paper or creative project; final exam

     

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    Psychology of Public Opinion - 1007H
    Prof. Malka
    Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with PSY 3110H

     
    This multidisciplinary seminar will overview social scientific research on the psychological and social processes that underlie political opinion.
    Students will learn about empirical research in psychology and political science dealing with the origins and consequences of mass political attitudes. Some of the major topics we will cover are psychological and survey research methodology, genetic and environmental influences on political attitudes, political thinking, public opinion and election polling, and aggregate political opinion.
    The course will focus heavily on empirical studies and their conclusions. It will also include a current events component in which students discuss articles and blog posts that analyze recent public opinion evidence.Students enrolled in the honors section of this course will complete additional readings and writing assignments.

     

    Sociology of Race and Racism - 1016H


     Prof. Stuart


     Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15

     Cross-listed with SOC 2306H

     
    Course description in process

     

    HISTORY

    The European Enlightenment - 2127H


     Prof. Freedman


     Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

    The European Enlightenment of the eighteenth century stands out as one of the great watersheds in the history of western culture. In theory, if not always in practice, it challenged all forms of traditional authority to justify themselves before the bar of reason; and in so doing, it inaugurated a process of critique that unsettled the very foundations of knowledge.
    This course is designed to introduce students to some of the main themes of the Enlightenment. It will begin by mapping the intellectual terrain, considering the Enlightenment as a formal body of thought. Then it will turn to the problem of diffusion, assessing how far, in what forms, and through which channels Enlightenment thought was able to spread beyond the ranks of intellectuals. It will conclude by considering some of the criticisms of the Enlightenment developed by philosophers and theorists in later periods—notably, those of Hans-Georg Gadamer, Alisdair MacIntyre, and Theordor Adorno and Max Horkheimer. The focus of the course will be on France, the heartland of the Enlightenment, but there will also be some consideration of developments in Britain and Germany. Readings will include works by such eighteenth-century authors as Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, and Diderot, as well as scholarship by twentieth- and twenty-first-century historians. 

     

    HONORS

    Honors Thesis Seminar sessions focus on various aspects of the writing process and are shaped by the students' concerns and interests. Among other things, we may study process writing, disciplinary writing style differences, revision techniques, time management, and methods of organization. These seminars also help to create a scholarly community among our senior thesis writers.

     
    Honors Thesis Proposal - 4977H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H

    Honors Thesis Seminar I - 4978H

    STAFF
    Corequisite: HON 4977H or HON 4980H

    4979H Honors Thesis Seminar II - 4979H
    STAFF
    Corequisite: HON 4980H or 4981H

    Honors Thesis: Preparation - 4980H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

    Honors Thesis: Writing - 4981H
    Prof. Cwilich
    Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

    INTERPRETING THE CREATIVE

    Rembrandt and the Jews - 1023H


     Prof. Soloveichik & Prof. Wisse

     
Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30
    Cross-listed with ART 1023H

     
    Acclaimed for his Protestant-influenced interpretation of Scripture, Rembrandt van Rijn’s art – paintings, prints and drawings – demonstrate a rich sensitivity to specifically Jewish ideas and concerns. The artist's association with Rabbi Menasseh ben Israel and other members of Amsterdam’s Jewish community influenced his approach to Hebrew Biblical subjects, as well as his understanding of Christian theology. This inter-disciplinary course explores the character of Rembrandt’s depictions of Hebrew Biblical and Christian subjects by examining their relationship to Jewish exegesis, including Talmudic, Midrashic and Kabbalistic literature, to contemporary Jewish life in Amsterdam and to the art historical tradition. We will examine Rembrandt’s connections to the Jewish community of Amsterdam, his knowledge of and perspective on Jewish sources and customs, and the master’s place within the larger context of art history and theological discourse.

     

    JEWISH HISTORY

    Medieval Jewish History - 1300H


     Prof. Levin


     Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45

     

     Course description in process

     
    Classical Intellectual Jewish History - 2210H


     Prof. Bernstein


     Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15

     Course description in process

     

    MATHEMATICS

    Please note that all Honors math courses will be offered through the graduate school

    Statistical Mechanics - 5305


     Prof. Cwilich


     Sec 361 Tu 6:45-9:15

     Cross-listed with PHY 1510H
    Course description in process

     
    Chaotic Dynamical Systems - 5303


     Prof. Gidea


     Sec 261 M 6:00-8:30

     Course description in process

     

     Mathematical Logic and Computational Theory - 5312

     
Prof. Lebow

     
Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45

     Cross-listed with COM 1504/C
    Note: Will only receive Honors credit if taken as MAT 5312
    Course description in process

     

     Topics in Functional Analysis I: K Theory and C* Algebras - 5330


     Prof. Prodan


     Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

     
    Perhaps many of us have asked ourselves why difficult problems sometime accept very simple and beautiful solutions? Looking back at these solutions, one could see that, independent of the origins of the problem, the solution is enabled by the algebra set in motion between different data of the problem. It is then fair to say that (abstract) algebra is the unifying theme of these solutions. C*-algebras are very general yet very special, in the sense that they are equipped with a norm which emerges from pure algebraic considerations. Having a norm on the algebra enables one to work, for example, with infinite series and also gives us access to powerful tools such as the K-groups. The goal of this course is to study by examples the C*-algebras and their K-theories, to define various representations which connect to difficult real-world problems and ultimately to solve these problems by techniques to be developed during the course. This will enable the students to see how different problems arising from physics, biophysics, materials science, engineering, social sciences, finances are related to each other, and to gain a more global and overarching understanding by placing them in the unifying field of C*-algebras and their K-theories.

    MUSIC

    Music and the Brain - 1829H


     Prof. Ballan


     Sec 361 Tu Th 6:45-8:00
    Cross-listed with PSY 3829H
    The course begins with an examination of the origins and psychobiology of musicality. We will examine hypotheses and evidence from evolution, cognitive semiotics, the history of ritual, neuroscience and neuroimaging.
The course continues with a look at musicality in infancy. Here we examine infant rhythms as expressions of musical companionship and the voices of shared emotion and meaning.
    Next we turn to musicality and healing. We examine therapeutic dialogues in music from several points of view, psychobiological, social and aesthetic.
In the fourth part of the course, we turn to musicality in childhood learning, looking at studies of musicality in talk and listening, spontaneous musicality, vitality in music and dance as basic life experiences, and intimacy and reciprocity in improvisation.
    In the final part of the course, we look at musicality in performance, from ceremonial ritual and the developmental biology of rhythm to body movements and creative participation in performance, including advanced performance.

    PHILOSOPHY

    Ancient and Medieval Philosophy - 2170H 


     Prof. Johnson


     Sec 261 M W 6:45-8:00

     
Course description in process

     
    Topics: Judaism and Democracy - 4930H

     
Prof. Soloveichik


     Sec 341 Tu Th 4:30-5:45



    The purpose of the seminar is to bring classic Jewish philosophical, theological and halakhic texts about government into conversation with the foundational philosophical works of American political thought. In so doing, we will consider the following questions: How did Jewish political philosophy, and its concept of covenant impact the eventual structure and nature of the United States?  How did the Bible figure in the philosophical debates about democracy and monarchy that took place in Britain and the colonies during the century before America’s founding?  What role might Hebraic ideas have played in influencing philosophers and thinkers such as Locke, Milton, Paine and Burke?  What tensions exist between the notion of religious authority and the modern conception of personal autonomy, and how do we see this dialectic play out in the Enlightenment philosophers' debates about identity and human nature?  In what way is the United States different from European democracies, and what is the role of religion in American public life?

     

    PHYSICS

    Statistical Mechanics - 1510H

     
Prof. Cwilich


     Sec 361 Tu 6:45-9:15
    Cross-listed with MAT 5305
    Course description in process

    POLITICAL SCIENCE

    American Foreign Policy - 1305H

     
Prof. Zaiseva

     
Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15

     
    The course examines the sources and conduct of U.S. foreign policy in both historical and theoretical perspectives. The first part of the course explores the domestic and international sources of American foreign policy. In particular, it looks at the roles of international system, ideas, government agencies, and public opinion, as they relate to various issues of U.S. foreign policy in the post-1945 period. The second half of the course examines several key issues of American policy-making, including U.S.-Soviet relations during the Cold War, globalization, nuclear proliferation, the Arab Spring, humanitarian intervention, among others. The course aims to introduce students to theories behind the conduct of US foreign policy and to apply those theories to various issues in the practice of US foreign policy in the post WWII period. The course also aims to strengthen students’ analytical and writing skills through several research and writing assignments.   

     
    Presidential Elections - 3115H

     
Prof. Bevan & Prof. Lieberman


     Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45

    The Presidential campaign/election of 2016 will be a historical benchmark. Both the Republican Party and the Democratic Party have been jolted by upstart candidates. Will the Republican Party recover? Will the convention/nomination system sustain itself in the future? In this Honors course students will hear the narrative and commentary of Senator Joseph Lieberman, himself a history-making vice presidential candidate with Presidential candidate Al Gore in 2000. The course intends to offer internship possibilities. Student oral and written projects on the current election as well as a midterm and final exam will be required.

    PSYCHOLOGY

    Psychology of Public Opinion - 3110H

     Prof. Malka
    Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15
    Crosslisted with HBSI 1007H

     
    This multidisciplinary seminar will overview social scientific research on the psychological and social processes that underlie political opinion.
    Students will learn about empirical research in psychology and political science dealing with the origins and consequences of mass political attitudes. Some of the major topics we will cover are psychological and survey research methodology, genetic and environmental influences on political attitudes, political thinking, public opinion and election polling, and aggregate political opinion.
    The course will focus heavily on empirical studies and their conclusions. It will also include a current events component in which students discuss articles and blog posts that analyze recent public opinion evidence.Students enrolled in the honors section of this course will complete additional readings and writing assignments.

    Music and the Brain - 3829H


     Prof. Ballan


     Sec 361 Tu Th 6:45-8:00
    Cross-listed with PSY 1829H

     
    The course begins with an examination of the origins and psychobiology of musicality. We will examine hypotheses and evidence from evolution, cognitive semiotics, the history of ritual, neuroscience and neuroimaging.
The course continues with a look at musicality in infancy. Here we examine infant rhythms as expressions of musical companionship and the voices of shared emotion and meaning.
    Next we turn to musicality and healing. We examine therapeutic dialogues in music from several points of view, psychobiological, social and aesthetic.
In the fourth part of the course, we turn to musicality in childhood learning, looking at studies of musicality in talk and listening, spontaneous musicality, vitality in music and dance as basic life experiences, and intimacy and reciprocity in improvisation.
    In the final part of the course, we look at musicality in performance, from ceremonial ritual and the developmental biology of rhythm to body movements and creative participation in performance, including advanced performance.

     

    SOCIOLOGY

    Sociology of Race and Racism - 2306H

     
Prof. Stuart

     
Sec 331 Tu Th 3:00-4:15
    Cross-listed with SOC 1016H
    Course description in process


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