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     » Please see below for the current semester’s offerings.

     

    Beginning September 2010, the new English curriculum is in effect for all YC and Syms students. Through May 2010, all courses now designated as T2000 under the new English curriculum satisfy the current College Literature requirement ("Literature 1") as the following courses listed under the pre-2009 English curriculum: ENG 2003, 2004, 2005, 2201, 2202, 2611, 2612. ENG 2010 continues to satisfy that same requirement as well.

    Any literature course ("T" or "F", 2000 or 3000) will satisfy the College's current 2nd Literature requirement "(Literature 2"); for the sake of breadth, however, an "F" or 3000 level course is recommended.

    Courses designated "W" signify writing courses. They DO NOT fulfill either of the College's current Literature requirements, they do, however, count towards the 3-credit writing requirement for the English major. An explanation of the "Traditions" (T) and "Forms" (F) rubrics appears on the last page of this packet.

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    All literature courses designated as T2000 under the new English curriculum satisfy the current College Literature requirement (“Literature 1”), including Eng 2010, “Interpreting Texts,” the gateway course required of all majors.   Any literature course (“T” or “F,” 2000 or 3000) will satisfy the College’s current 2nd Literature requirement “(Literature 2”).  For the sake of breadth, however, an “F” or 3000 level course is recommended.   The courses designated as CORE COURSES (INTC, COWC< CUOT) satisfy both Literature requirements.

     

    While writing courses DO NOT fulfill either of the College’s current Literature requirements, they DO count towards the 3-credit writing requirement for the English major.    An explanation of the “Traditions” (T) and “Forms” (F) rubrics appears on the last page of this packet.

     

     

    SPRING 2014

    YESHIVA COLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

    COURSE OFFERINGS

     

     

     

    ENG 1721   Introduction to Creative Writing:  Storycraft  ( W)

    Section 461     W 6:45-9:15  pm                             Dr. Barbara Blatner

     

    Do you have stories to tell?

    In this workshop, you will practice the ancient art of storytelling by writing in three genres, fiction, poetry and drama/comedy, and adapt narrative elements - structure, voice, imagery, reversals of action - to the demands of each genre.  You will write a piece each week, share your writing, and read as writers.  Readings include works by Chekhov, Babel, Moore, Marquez, Olds, Waldman and Churchill.  Attendance at one literary reading in the greater Manhattan area is required. Grades will be based on a final portfolio, class participation, and your willingness to grow as writers.

     

    This course fulfills the Writing requirement for the English major, and can be counted toward the Writing minor.

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR

     

    ENG 1729   Adapting Short Stories by Kafka and Others   ( W)

    Section 331     TTh 3:00-4:15                               Prof. Carin White


    This course will adapt short stories into other genres, focusing primarily on the work of Franz Kafka. Students will engage in 3 short projects in the first half of the semester, while viewing examples of adaptation from short fiction into other genres. In the latter half of the semester they will select one of their three projects and develop a larger project in class through regular workshopping and sharing of material. Film, visual art, visiting artists, and outside texts will be used to supplement the course.

     
    Basic Course Requirements:

    Requirements: Three short adaptation assignments, participation in writing workshops, a final adaptation project

    This course fulfills the Writing requirement for the English major, and can be counted toward the Writing minor.  

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR

     

    ENG 2010  Interpreting Texts:  Literary Reading and Critical Practice_(T2000)

    Section 341   TTh 4:30-5:45                                 Dr. Elizabeth Stewart

     

    As gateway to the English major, this course explores theories of language and writing, of reading, and of the act of interpretation. Students are exposed to an array of theoretical approaches to literature and to the most influential contemporary schools of criticism. They will discover how reading and writing literature always already implies “theory” and the ways in which literary and theoretical/critical texts mutually enrich one another. The course begins with seminal texts in the classical western literary and philosophical traditions (Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle).  These foundational texts establish many of the prevailing philosophical, ethical, political, psychological, and social concerns for the history of criticism and for the remainder of our course.  We will then focus on those contemporary theoretical paradigms that define the field of literary studies today: formalist/structuralist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, gender and sexuality studies, deconstructive/postmodernist, and post-colonial.

    Requirements: active class participation; oral presentation(s); one 8-10 pp. essay; midterm & final exams.

    This course is a 2000 level “Traditions” course in the English Major designed to pose questions about literary history and literary tradition like, “how do texts generate histories? and, where do history, text, and cultural context intersect?” 

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Required of all English majors; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 2014    Encountering the American Unknown:  Early American Literature (T2000)

    Section 341   TTh 4:30-5:45                                 Dr. Joanne Jacobson

     

    In this course we will read early American literature, from the late fifteenth century through the late nineteenth century, as a series of encounters between the known and the unknown.  Our discussion will examine the strategies through which literature of this period negotiated and shaped the relationship between “old” and “new” worlds:  constituting an arena of language for the unfamiliar; defining, and re-defining, the terms of community and nation; engaging, and re-engaging, notions of human authority, potential and creativity; claiming literature itself as a voice—and an agent—of modernity.

    Texts will include a sixteenth-century European explorer narrative, a seventeenth-century Indian captivity narrative and a nineteenth-century escaped slave narrative; Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography; Henry David Thoreau’s Maine Woods; fiction by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville; poetry by Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman.

    Course requirements will include committed and well-informed contributions to class discussion; a set of 4-5 critical journals; a 5-8 critical essay; and a final examination.

    This course is a 2000 level “Traditions” course in the English Major designed to pose questions about literary history and literary tradition like, “how do texts generate histories? and, where do history, text, and cultural context intersect?” 

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 2042  Milton and the 17th Century:  Love, God, and Money   (T2000)

    Section 241   MW 4:30-5:45                                 Dr. Manfred Weidhorn


    Introduction to one of the major periods of world literature. We begin with the poetry of John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Lovelace, and Andrew Marvell—men who have produced some of the most memorable love poetry and religious poetry in the language. Then we study the essays of Francis Bacon, followed by a glance at his influential philosophical writings and those of Thomas Hobbes. The latter two are important for revealing the impact of the Scientific Revolution on culture, which involves nothing less than the greatest paradigm shift in human history. The last half of the course is devoted to the second greatest poet in English, John Milton. We will explicate the monumental short poem, “Lycidas,” and then look at some of his sonnets and at selections from his voluminous prose writings. We will conclude with PARADISE LOST, a ten-thousand line epic about Adam and Eve, with which Milton hoped to answer the problem of evil while concurrently matching the achievement of Homer, Virgil, and Dante. Did he fulfill either wish? We read, and you decide. Should any time be left, we will, by way of a coda, look at Milton’s late closet drama on Shimshon Hagibbor, SAMSON AGONISTES.


    Class discussion centers on form and content; imagery and the “metaphysical conceit”; meter, stanza forms, couplets, sound effects, diction; sentence structure; religious commitment and resulting tensions; intellectual crosscurrents; moral predicament and lyrical effusion; epic statement and satiric thrust; cerebral and sensuous responses to experience; the problem of evil; the impact of science and rationalism on the literary imagination; the relation of literature to life; the major scholarly and critical approaches to the writers; the varieties of Christianity, the Puritan rebellion, feminism and misogyny,  the meaning of important words like wit, Puritanism, Epicureanism, libertinism, fideism, irony, satire. Notice will be taken of the scholarship on the period and of the changing reputations of Donne and Milton.


    Requirements:

    Attendance is strongly urged.
    Two short esays (1000 words each) and a longer one (3000). Midterm and final examinations.

    This course is a 2000 level “Traditions” course in the English Major designed to pose questions about literary history and literary tradition like, “how do texts generate histories? and, where do history, text, and cultural context intersect?” 

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 2535    Interpreting Poetry:  Shakespeare Through the Avant Garde  (F2000)

    Section 231   MW 3:00-4:15                                 Dr. Will Lee

     

    This course aims to demystify poetry, rendering even difficult poems more accessible and familiar, not to mention interesting.  You will learn how to understand and interpret a wide range of poems beginning with formal poetry like Shakespeare’s sonnets and ending with the experimental poetry of British and American high modernists.  You will expand their interpretive repertoire in ways that apply to writings beyond poetry including modernist novels.  The course will count as 2000 level Forms elective within the English major, as an elective within the English minor, and as a Yeshiva College elective.

    Requirements:  attendance and participation; readings of poems and critical essays; two short interpretive essays of 4-6 pages; focused revision; brief oral presentation; 10-12 page review of a modern or contemporary poet (model:  Helen Vendler in NYRB); take-home final

    This course is a 2000-level “Forms” course in the English major designed to pose questions about literary forms, practices, and interpretive communities like “who reads, who writes, and through which lens?” 


    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 2059H  Crime Fiction in the 19th, 20th and 21st Centuries  (F2000)

    Section 331     TTh 3:00-4:15                               Dr. Elizabeth Stewart

     

    Interrelations of crime and punishment, good and evil, law enforcement and sociopathy, sanity and madness, as seen through the prism of crime drama in film, television, and literature. Additional topics are "cracking" and confessing; the mind of the criminal and the mind of the detective; identity and social order. Authors include Kafka, Dostoevsky, Melville, Poe, Genet, Harris. Films: Heavenly Creatures, The Silence of the Lambs, M; TV: Prime Suspect, Luther, Breaking Bad.

    Requirements: Midterm and final exams; 1 essay (8-10 pp); 1 presentation; consistent class attendance and participation.

    This course is a 2000 level “Traditions” course in the English Major designed to pose questions about literary history and literary tradition like, “how do texts generate histories? and, where do history, text, and cultural context intersect?” 

    Pre-requisite: Honors standing or permission to attend an Honors course; Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR;.  Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 3131      Approaches to Film                                                                   ( F3000)

    Section 361   TR 6:30– 8:45 pm                                                      Dr. Paula Geyh

     

    From the earliest Edison kinetoscopes of the 1890s to Cameron’s 3-D Avatar and beyond,

    the cinema has captivated us and shaped our expectations and understanding of the world.

                This course will introduce students to the basics of analyzing film. We’ll focus primarily on the close reading of elements of mise-en-scène and montage, playing particular attention to how they come together to produce meaning. We’ll also briefly discuss film genres and their conventions, and different theoretical approaches to film. Texts will include Kawin, How Movies Work; Elsaesser and Hagener, Film Theory: An Introduction Through the Senses.  Films will include A Trip to the Moon; Sherlock Jr.; Man with the Movie Camera; Rear Window; It Happened One Night, Citizen Kane; Casablanca; The Searchers; Singin’ in the Rain; La Jetée; Meshes of the Afternoon; Vertigo; Breathless; and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

     

    Requirements: Three papers and two exams.

    This course is a 3000-level (advanced) “Forms” course in the English major designed to pose questions about literary forms, practices, and interpretive communities like “who reads, who writes, and through which lens?”

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

     ENG 3588  Channeling Bruno Schulz: A Writer, His Fiction, & His Fictionalizers  ( F3000)

    Section 261   MW 6:450–8:00 pm                         Dr. Adam Zachary Newton

     

    “November 19, 1941

    How sad to think that at 30 Mazeppa Street, where I spent so many lovely hours, no one will be left, all of it will become mere legend.  I don’t know why I feel guilty toward myself, as if I had lost something and it was my own fault.”                                                                  [Bruno Schulz to Anna Płockier]                                                   

    In this course we will devote ourselves to the work of Bruno Schulz (b. Drohobycz July 12, 1892; d. Drohobycz November 19, 1942): two slim collections of literary short fiction written in 1934 and 1937, a small collection of letters and critical essays, and his drawings.  That will constitute the first level of our two-tiered inquiry.  The second will attend to the fate of that work—the strange story of its adoption or appropriation by a group of contemporary novelists, mostly Jewish-Americans: Cynthia Ozick (The Messiah of Stockholm), Jonathan Safran Foer (Tree of Codes), Nicole Krauss (The History of Love), and Philip Roth (The Prague Orgy); Israelis David Grossman (See Under: Love) and Amir Gutfreund (“Trieste”).  We’ll also read short excerpts from another set of Schulz epigones: Chilean Robert Bolaño (Distant Star), Anglo-Indian Salman Rushdie (The Moor’s Last Sigh) and Briton China Miéville (The City & the City), as well as criticism by J.M. Coetzee, Jaroslav Anders, Adam Thirwell, etc. Finally, we’ll examine adaptations of Schulz’s work into other media: The Street of Crocodiles as reimagined by stop-motion animators the Brothers Quay and as adapted for performance by the British theater company Complicite.

    A parallel story about Schulz concerns his biographical fate—gratuitously murdered by one Nazi in retribution for the death of another Nazi's "personal Jew"—along with the fate of rediscovered murals that he drew for the daughter of his Gestapo protector in 1942.  A portion of that artwork, considered a Jewish heritage, was clandestinely transported by representatives of Yad Vashem to Israel in an act of cultural repatriation bitterly contested at the time by Ukraine and Polish authorities who also wished to claim Schulz as “their own.”

     

    Thus, in addition to reading—with the kind of depth and complexity they deserve—the exquisite and wholly singular works of art created by Schulz and the literary homages they have inspired, this course will inquire into what he might call “literary patrimony”—the various assumptions that underlie how art is claimed as “one's own” (through culture, nation-state, tradition) in respect to others and as opposed to “another's.”  Proprietary ownership, endowment, and belonging:  these are some of the correlatives we will ponder in relation to the local and the global, the particular and the universal, as we traverse the world republic of letters from 1930s Drohobycz to late 20th and 21st c. America, Israel, and beyond.

    Course requirements and grade percentages

     

             Mandatory attendance/Sedulous Participation                                           40%

             Weekly postings to the discussion forum on Angel                                    5%

             Close reading assignment                                                                         10%

             One shorter essay—5 pages                                                                     15%

             One longer essay—8-10 pages                                                                  20%

             Take-home Final Exam                                                                               10%

     

    This course is a 3000-level (advanced) “Forms” course in the English major designed to pose questions about literary forms, practices, and interpretive communities like “who reads, who writes, and through which lens?

    Pre-requisite: ENG 1101 or 1931H or FYWR; Satisfies Lit.1 or Lit.2 requirement only for students who were on campus prior to April 2012. For students on campus starting April 2012, this course can be used toward major or elective requirements only.

     

    ENG 4002      Senior Colloquium                                                           _______________________

    Section 381   T 8:15-9:45 pm                                                          Dr. Joanne Jacobson

     

    This course is required for the completion of the English major, and concludes with an oral exam.

    Pre-requisite:  senior standing in the English major

     

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